First, What are You Reading? Volume 1, August 2010

Without further ado, here are the questions and my answers for this first volume of “First, What are You Reading?”

If you want to read about my thinking for this new feature, read my previous post here.

First, what are you reading?

What do you like best about it?
Too often we think that we have to make big grand changes in life to really make a difference, but this book argues persuasively that small changes can make a huge difference in business, relationships, and health. 
Most fascinating in this book was learning that self-control is finite.  The authors quote numerous studies to show that once you “use up” your self-control resisting, say, chocolate chip cookies, you are less likely to persist in say, writing your next column, instead of checking Facebook or watching Gilligan’s Island episodes with your kids. (Not that I have any experience with either of those situations, LOL).
The authors show that if you can direct the rider (the self-control), motivate the elephant (the passions), and shape the path (control the environment), change becomes much easier.
What do you like least about it?
Not much.  It’s really that good. 
One funny story:  The book has exhaustive chapter notes at the back that are actually quite fascinating and informative.  One of the chapter notes recommends the book, “Divorce Busters” as a book anyone should read to strengthen relationships.  I immediately put it on hold online to arrive at our local library, and when it arrived it raised some eyebrows from the excellent library ladies who know me so well at our small library.
What is next on your list to read?
The Hunger Games and Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins.  I’ve seen several Facebook friends recommend this young adult  (YA) series, and so I’m planning to dive in.  It looks like not my kind of YA fiction, but I’m keeping an open mind.
I am also working my way through quite a few books about and by Cardinal John Henry Newman, as one of those books will be our September selection at the Catholic Post Book Group, since he will be beatified in September.
If you are a blogger, please consider using the Mr. Linky post at the bottom.  Don’t forget to link back to here so others visiting your blog can also join in the fun!
If you are not a blogger, please take a moment to leave a comment and share what you are reading—even just the title and author is fine, though your one or more sentence review would be great.

Here are the four questions again.  You can answer any or all:
First, what are you reading?
What do you like best about it?
What do you like least about it?
What is next on your list to read?

If you are a blogger, please consider using the Mr. Linky post at the bottom.  Don’t forget to link back to here so others visiting your blog can also join in the fun!
If you are not a blogger, please take a moment to leave a comment and share what you are reading—even just the title and author is fine, though your one or more sentence review would be great.

 

 

I look forward to hearing about your “reads.”

4 thoughts on “First, What are You Reading? Volume 1, August 2010”

  1. I have recently been reading:
    Sh#t My Dad Says
    Open (Andre Agasssi autobiography)
    Of Mice and Men
    The Brothers Karamazov
    Scat

    As for Sh#t my Dad Says, I’d have to say this book was overrated in the reviews. It was too crude and the gems were too few to make it a decent read. Fortunately it was a short book and not much time wasted.

    Open was interesting because I had a big crush on Agassi in high school. It really opened my eyes to how unglamorous celebrity life can be. It seemed very honest, but I thought there were several tennis game memories that weren’t always interesting. His early life was really sad and I like a good story about people turning a bad beginning positive.

    Of Mice and Men: I read this because every now and then I get on a classics kick. I read them purely for fun and not scholarship. I liked it. I liked Grapes of Wrath by Steinbeck a little better, but this was good too.

    Lest you think I am a great reader, I failed when it came to The Brothers Karamazov. I’m not sure if it was the translation, but I couldn’t finish it. I thought I’d like it, but I kept getting interrupted while reading it, and it is hard to read a book like that when you have to put the book down every two pages to clean up some spilled food, puke, or poop. So, I didn’t get very far, but I might revisit it someday. I had hope for it because I liked War and Peace, but I guess it would be unfair to group all Russian authors together.

    Scat is a kid lit book that so far seems to be on the very pro environment side. This is okay, but I can get annoyed when kid books get too preachy. It seems like the story can get sacrificed to make the author’s point. I’m a little curious as to where it is going. It is written bt the same author as Hoot. I haven’t read that, but I have heard some about the movie.

    I am looking forward to the Suzanne Collins third book in the Hunger Games trilogy being released.

  2. Bree, I’ve never read Brothers Karamazov, but I think translation is so important. The newer translation of Anna Karenina is so much better than the older ones, it really makes a difference.

    I read an excerpt of the Agassi book and it was so sad. My tennis player crush was Boris Becker, but fortunately he has not written a tell-all so far as I know. I’ve got enough to read at the moment. LOL.

  3. On Facebook (on the Catholic Post page–“like” it to get updates regularly– quite a few people have shared books they are reading.

    Some highlights

    Mary is reading Render Under Ceasar: Serving the Nation by Living our Catholic Beliefs

    Wendy is reading, “Did Adam & Eve have Belly Buttons?”

    Dan is reading, “Answering the New Atheism”

    Thanks for all the great suggestions, and for lengthening my to-read list. As if it’s not long enough!

  4. I am reading “A Mother’s Rule of Life: How to Bring Order to Your Home and Peace to Your Soul” by Holly Pierlot. It has definitely spoken to my heart and is helping me to instill order in my life and put God at the center of everything! I had it on my shelf for a while, and I am certain it is the Holy Spirit who led me to pick it up. Though the title may sound dry, the book is at times riveting as Holly shares both her personal conversion from disobedience, rebellion and disorder in her life, and also doles out plenty of practical, do-it-right-now assistance in prioritizing and ordering ones own life.

    There is nothing I dislike about the book! It has opened new doors for me and has been a breath of fresh air. Very Catholic in thought and very uplifting.

    I am also reading “Choosing Civility: The 25 Rules of Considerate Conduct” by P.M. Forni.

    What I like best about the book is the observations Forni makes about why society is so broken today…basic civility is not being employed as widely as it once was (witness any TV talk show or “news” program, and one can see this readily!). This book takes a systematic look at how we can treat others in a civil manner.

    To me, the only thing lacking in the book is the back up of Christian examples…Forni does quote Paul of Tarsus occasionally, but I am always missing the opportunity as I read to see Jesus as the ultimate example. But don’t let that stop you from picking the book up, especially if you feel you may lack some formation in this virtue!

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